EACO Friendly

    Pollinating the world

Developing Africa

Serving communities of Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda

with an emphasis on helping the dispossessed.


About Malawi

Overview

Developing the World

The Republic of Malawi, is a landlocked country in southeast Africa that was formerly known as Nyasaland.
 

Location
Administrative units
Dempgraphics
Status
Education
Disease
Development


Malawi

Location

Malawi is bordered by Zambia to the northwest, Tanzania to the northeast, and Mozambique on the east, south and west. The country is separated from Tanzania and Mozambique by Lake Malawi. 


Administrative units

The capital of Malawi is Lilongwe, which is also Malawi's largest city; the second largest is Blantyre, the third is Mzuzu and the fourth largest is its old capital Zomba. The name Malawi comes from the Maravi, an old name of the Nyanja people that inhabit the area. 

Demographics

Malawi has a population of over 15 million, with a growth rate of 2.75%, according to 2009 estimates. The population is forecast to grow to over 45 million people by 2050, nearly tripling the estimated 16 million in 2010.

Malawi's population is made up of the Chewa, Nyanja, Tumbuka, Yao, Lomwe, Sena, Tonga, Ngoni, and Ngonde native ethnic groups, as well as populations of Asians and Europeans. 

The official language is English. Major languages include Chichewa, a language spoken by over 57% of the population, Chinyanja (12.8%), Chiyao (10.1%), and Chitumbuka (9.5%).] There are 7 other native languages. 

Status

As of 2010, international observers noted issues in several human rights areas. However, the government was seen to make some effort to prosecute security forces who used excessive force. 

Other legal issues included limits on free speech and freedom of the press, lengthy pretrial detentions, and arbitrary arrests and detentions. 

Societal issues found included violence against women, human trafficking, and child labour. Malawi had one of the highest rates of child marriage in the world. In 2015 Malawi raised the legal age for marriage from 15 to 18. Other issues that have been raised are lack of adequate legal protection of women from sexual abuse and harassment, very high maternal mortality rate, and abuse related to accusations of witchcraft.

Corruption within the government is seen as a major issue, despite the Malawi Anti-Corruption Bureau's (ACB) attempts to reduce it. The ACB appears to be successful at finding and prosecuting low level corruption, but higher level officials appear to be able to act with impunity. Corruption within security forces is also an issue. 

As of 2010, homosexuality has been illegal in Malawi. President Joyce Banda has pledged to repeal laws criminalising homosexuality.

Education

In Malawi, primary education is not compulsory.The Constitution requires that all people be entitled to at least five years of primary education.

In 1994, free primary education for all children was established by the government, which increased attendance rates. Dropout rates are higher for girls than boys, attributed to security problems during the long travel to school, as girls face a higher prevalence of gender-based violence. 

Enrollment rates for primary schools are 75%, while the number of students who begin in standard one and complete standard five is 86%. However attendance in secondary school falls to approximately 25%, with attendance rates being slightly higher for males. 

Youth literacy is 82% due to improved learning materials in schools, better infrastructure and feeding programs that have been implemented throughout the school system.

Education in Malawi comprises eight years of primary education, four years of secondary school and four years of university.

There are four public universities in Malawi. Besides these, there are also private universities like; Livingstonia, Malawi Lakeview, Catholic University of Malawi,MIM etc. 

The entry requirements is six credits on the Malawi school Certificate of Education certificate which is equivalent to O levels.

Disease

Infant mortality rates are high, and life expectancy at birth is 50.03 years. 

There is a high adult prevalence rate of HIV/AIDS, with approximately 250 new people are infected each day, and at least 70% of Malawi's hospital beds are occupied by HIV/AIDS patients. 

There is a very high degree of risk for major infectious diseases, including bacterial and protozoal diarrhoea, hepatitis A, typhoid fever, malaria, plague, schistosomiasis, and rabies.

Malawi has been making progress on decreasing child mortality and reducing the incidences of HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases; however, the country has been performing dismally on reducing maternal mortality and promoting gender equality.

Female genital mutilation (FGM), while not widespread, is practiced in some local communities.[79]

Development

Malawi is among the world's least-developed countries. Around 85% of the population live in rural areas. The economy is based on agriculture, and more than one-third of GDP and 90% of export revenues come from this. 

In the past, the economy has been dependent on substantial economic aid from the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund (IMF), and other countries. Malawi was ranked the 119th safest investment destination in the world in the March 2011 Euromoney Country Risk rankings.

In December 2000, the IMF stopped aid disbursements due to corruption concerns, and many individual donors followed suit, resulting in an almost 80% drop in Malawi's development budget.

The Malawian government faces challenges in developing a market economy, improving environmental protection, dealing with the rapidly growing HIV/AIDS problem, improving the education system, and satisfying its foreign donors that it is working to become financially independent. 

Improved financial discipline had been seen since 2005 under the leadership of President Mutharika and Financial Minister Gondwe. 

In addition, some setbacks have been experienced, and Malawi has lost some of its ability to pay for imports due to a general shortage of foreign exchange. 

There are many investment barriers in Malawi, which the government has failed to address, including high service costs and poor infrastructure for power, water, and telecommunications. 

Agriculture accounts for 35% of GDP, industry for 19% and services for the remaining 46%. Malawi has one of the lowest per capita incomes in the world.

The poverty rate in Malawi is decreasing through the work of the government and supporting organizations, with people living under the poverty line decreasing.

Many analysts believe that economic progress for Malawi depends on its ability to control population growth.

Model farming

Teaching modern methods

Local knowledge is fast disappearing from the communities. EACO Friendly has a solution which provides recent learning with apprenticeships with those communities....More

Health Centres

Care in the community

People often have to walk vast distances to get medical attention. EACO Friendly wants to provide health services in each community centre to provide quick and easy access to medical services...More

Education

Learning for all

Education is often unaffordable and is not compulsory. EACO Friendly  has a business case to solve this issue.

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Energy

Renewable Electricity

The UN has said that all will have access to energy by 2030. EACO Friendly has a solution to this now.

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Logistics

Sustainable Transport

Providing transport links to the often under supported communities in Mukono...

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Tourism

Cash for the community

EACO Friendly Honey is the first venture for EACO Friendly and will process honey for the community.... More

Value Added Products

Regular Income

A business best survives with higher prices and constant income...

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Water

Well delivery

We could spend all our efforts getting water to everyone in the communities. EACO Friendly has a plan to achieve this.

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Latest Ideas:
 

Duck Farming

Rabbit Farming


Agroforestry 



Livestock Farming