EACO Friendly

    Pollinating the world

Developing West Africa

Serving communities of Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda

with an emphasis on helping the dispossessed.



Why I would Grow Chickens

If you were living on $2 a day, what would you do to improve your life?

That's a real question for the nearly 1 billion people living in extreme poverty today. There's no single right answer, of course, and poverty looks different in different places. But through my work with the foundation, I've met many people in poor countries who raise chickens, and I have learned a lot about the ins and outs of owning these birds.

chickens

It's pretty clear to me that just about anyone who's living in extreme poverty is better off if they have chickens.

In fact, if I were in their shoes, that's what I would do -I would raise chickens.

Here's why:

  • They are easy and inexpensive to take care of. 

  • Many breeds can eat whatever they find on the ground (although it's better if you can feed them, because they'll grow faster). 

  • Hens need some kind of shelter where they can nest, and as your flock grows, you might want some wood and wire to make a coop.

  • Finally, chickens need a few vaccines. The one that prevents the deadly Newcastle disease costs less than 20 cents.

  • They're a good investment. Suppose a new farmer starts with five hens. One of her neighbors owns a rooster to fertilize the hens' eggs. After three months, she can have a flock of 40 chicks. Eventually, with a sale price of $5 per chicken, which is typical in West Africa, she can earn more than $1,000 a year, versus the extreme-poverty line of about $700 a year.

  • They help keep children healthy. Malnutrition kills more than 3.1 million children a year. Although eating more eggs,which are rich in protein and other nutrients, can help fight malnutrition, many farmers with small flocks find that it's more economical to let the eggs hatch, sell the chicks, and use the money to buy nutritious food. But if a farmer's flock is big enough to give her extra eggs, or if she ends up with a few broken ones, she may decide to cook them for her family.

  • They empower women. Because chickens are small and typically stay close to home, many cultures regard them as a woman's animal, in contrast to larger livestock like goats or cows. Women who sell chickens are likely to reinvest the profits in their families. 

Read more about women and chickens in Melinda Gate's blog post.

Dr. Batamaka Somé, an anthropologist from Burkina Faso who has worked with our foundation, has spent much of his career studying the economic impact of raising chickens in his home country. In this video he explains why he is so passionate about poultry

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